Taylor Swift doesn't want you to buy her new album

Pop star calls planned live album 'shameless greed'

Taylor Swift discouraged fans from buying her new live album planned to be released early Friday, writing on social media she had “not approved” of the release.

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The pop star posted a statement about the album on her Instagram story Thursday. According to Swift, the recording is a live radio performance from 2008, when she was 18. It’s being listed as a 2017 release by the record label, she wrote, even though it’s purportedly being released at midnight.

Taylor Swift at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles Nov. 24, 2019. (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

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Swift has been beefing with her former record label, Big Machine Records, since last summer when it was reportedly sold for $300 million to a group including record executive Scooter Braun, who she has accused of bullying her.

“It looks to me like Scooter Braun and his financial backers, 23 Capital, Alex Soros and the Soros family and The Carlyle Group have seen the latest balance sheets and realized that paying $330 MILLION for my music wasn’t exactly a wise choice and they need money,” Swift wrote in the Instagram post.

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There was no mention of a new album by Swift on Big Machine’s website or its social media channels as of Thursday afternoon. The company didn’t immediately respond to questions from FOX Business.

Swift called it “another case of shameless greed in the time of coronavirus.”

Taylor Swift attends the premiere of "Miss Americana" at the Eccles Theater during the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, in Park City, Utah. (Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

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“So tasteless, but very transparent,” she wrote.

In February, Swift signed a publishing agreement with Universal Music Publishing Group. The deal will cover new work she produces and eventually cover her full catalog once Sony/ATV Music Publishing’s rights to older songs expires, The New York Times reported.

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