Why does this haunted house scare the heck out of us?

McKamey Manor has been called the “scariest” haunted house in the country, requiring a doctor’s note, a safe word and a signed 40-page waiver.

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But what's the psychology behind wanting to get scared?

Psychotherapist Dr. Robi Ludwig spoke with FOX Business’ Connell McShane on Thursday and gave some examples of how this haunted house takes it to the next level.

Ludwig pointed to sensory deprivation, where participants are put in a darkened room, which "can cause bizarre thoughts, hallucinations."

"It creates learned helplessness where you feel like you can't control your environment and get out or free yourself," she said.

The manor is making headlines for their promise to give $20,000 to anyone who can make it through the haunted house. Reportedly, no one has done it yet. Ludwig said people who try to survive the estimated eight-hour process can't because they are exhausted.

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“What they are inducing is a form of psychological torture but for fun,” she said.

The haunted house reportedly makes participants "eat vomit" and "hold certain positions for a long time."

So why do it?

"These are true masochists that are in for an adrenaline rush to see if they can get through," Ludwig said.

Ludwig said there is an appeal to being terrified while knowing you are actually safe. She also pointed to the feeling of excitement and danger and said that’s why people like horror movies.

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