Robocallers undercover as Apple tech support, spoofing store numbers

Robocallers are disguising themselves as Apple tech support

Incessant robocalls have been a growing, worldwide frustration. During the month of October, there were 5.7 billion robocalls made, according to a report from robocall blocking app YouMail.

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In the midst of confusion and trust issues, robocallers have now stepped up their game by disguising themselves as Apple tech support.

Fox News Radio's Brett Larson played the voicemail on FOX Business' "FBN:am" Friday, which tries to get people to spend their money.

"To connect with Apple support adviser, press two. To listen to this message again, or if you wish to contact us later, please call us on our toll-free number: 208-262."

The number listed is not toll-free and, in fact, not real.

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But Larson said these scammers are getting better at disguising their calls technologically, just to get you to pick up the phone.

“What they've managed to do, these hackers, is they're spoofing actual either Apple store numbers or the Apple 800 number for tech support,” he said. “So when you look at your phone, it looks totally legitimate, but that voice should give it away.”

Apple says one way to combat robocalls is by not answering. There are also features built into iOS13 called “Silence Unknown Callers,” that will help block the calls. However, the setting doesn't completely stop calls. When the feature is turned on, it sends unknown callers straight to voicemail.

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Phone carriers have taken measures in slowing down calls and are notifying users when a call may be spam. Legislation has gotten involved as well by drafting the TRACED Act to prosecute callers.

Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) told FOX Business’ Stuart Varney earlier this month that 54 billion unsolicited calls were made this year, and he backs the act.

"We're going to do the best we can and work with both the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to make sure they are able to go after these bad actors, with real teeth in the law, and prosecute these cases," Walden said

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