Why Nike’s self-lacing shoes aren’t selling as quickly as last year’s model

Sneaker reviewer breaks down the demand for these new, tech-savvy shoes

While Nike’s 2019 self-lacing sneaker sold out immediately, this year’s version of the shoe isn’t doing as well.

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The previous model’s demand was “insane,” sneaker reviewer Seth Fowler said on Tuesday during FOX Business’ “Cavuto: Coast to Coast."

Fowler pointed to the high price tag (the 2020 model sells for $400, which is $50 more than the previous year's version) and the novelty of the technology wearing off as reasons for the shoe not selling as quickly.

“However, I do expect it to sell out in the next couple of weeks,” he added.

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Nike Adapt BB 2.0

Dubbed the Nike Adapt BB 2.0, the tech-enhanced sneaker allows wearers to control the fit via buttons on the sneaker itself or through the Nike Adapt app. The app also allows users to customize the sneaker light color and check charge levels.

The high price tag is due to the technology used in the shoe, Fowler told FOX Business’ Neil Cavuto, pointing to the motor in the mid-sole, the battery and the ability to charge wirelessly through the bottom of the shoe.

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Ahead of the general release, some Nike Adapt BB 2.0 sneakers sold on the secondary market. Resale platform StockX lists 216 total sales of the sneaker at an average price of $459, as of Tuesday afternoon.

Upgrades for the Adapt BB 2.0, compared to last year’s model, include the addition of “Air Zoom Turbo” cushioning to the sneaker. Nike said the addition is designed to give the sneakers a “bouncier” feeling on the basketball court.

Cavuto questioned whether water would affect the tech-filled shoe, for instance, if an athlete was running in the rain.

“I've actually wondered the same thing,” Fowler admitted. “So I did a test last year on last year's version, and it was fine.”

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Nike Adapt BB 2.0

Fowler noted the shoe is heavier than a standard basketball sneaker but “not overly heavy,” saying NBA and WNBA players have worn the sneaker while playing.

Memphis Grizzlies rookie guard Ja Morant, a Nike-sponsored athlete, wore the sneaker during a Jan. 20 game against the New Orleans Pelicans.

FOX Business’ Thomas Barrabi contributed to this article. 

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