Who is MLB Commissioner Robert Manfred?

Manfred, 62, has served as MLB’s commissioner since 2015.

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MLB Commissioner Robert Manfred is tasked with leading the sport known as “America’s pastime” into an uncertain future.

As commissioner, Manfred is MLB’s top executive, responsible for representing the league’s 30 team owners, leading negotiations with labor representatives and media rights partners and overseeing the league’s response to potential rules violations. He will play a key role in MLB’s effort, in conjunction with the MLB Players Association, to restart the 2020 season after the coronavirus pandemic forced an unprecedented delay.

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Manfred, 62, has served as MLB’s commissioner since 2015. He succeeded Bud Selig, who stepped down after a 17-year stint in the role and became MLB’s commissioner emeritus.

While Manfred’s exact salary is not publicly known, he is rumored to earn about $11 million per season, according to Washington Post and several other outlets. Manfred and other top MLB executives took 35 percent pay cuts in 2020 as part of cost-cutting measures related to the crisis.

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Before becoming commissioner, Manfred served under Selig as MLB’s chief operating officer. Prior to that role, he spent 15 years as an executive vice president at the league. In that position, he oversaw “labor relations, economics, league affairs and human resources,” according to MLB’s website.

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While he did not have an official role with MLB until 1998, he worked with the league as an outside counsel on collective bargaining matters starting in 1987. He holds degrees from Harvard Law School and Cornell University.

Manfred is under contract with MLB through the 2024 season.

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