Ex-Twitter exec says social media companies may ‘welcome’ some oversight

Regulations could allow Big Tech to avoid ‘political drama,’ Bruce Daisley said

As the debate over regulating social media grows, some tech companies may embrace a certain level of government oversight regarding speech issues, according to former Twitter Vice President Bruce Daisley.

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“We're recognizing that private businesses don't feel the right place for these decisions to be made,” Daisley said on FOX Business' “Varney and Co.” “And I think those businesses recognize it as well.”

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Daisley said Twitter “found itself very uncomfortable” deplatforming political leaders in the past, pointing to Iran’s Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as an example.

“They'd love to be able to run their business without getting involved in this political drama,” Daisley told host Stuart Varney. “And I suspect they'd welcome some degree of oversight.”

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Following President Trump's brief suspension after the violence that took place on Capitol Hill, Twitter announced the president will no longer be able to tweet. Trump has also been removed from other social media platforms, including Facebook, Reddit and Instagram.

Daisley said Big Tech leaders are recognizing that “regulation is coming” all over the world. He pointed to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s previous comments welcoming regulation to some extent.

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“It does beg the question: Who will be the regulators?” Daisley added. “Because obviously, if that becomes politicized, then we could see something that's even less agreeable than what we have now.”

Trump's ban from Twitter appeared to be part of what many have referred to as a "purge" of the social media giant's users, including former pro-Trump attorneys Lin Wood and Sidney Powell, as well as former National Security Adviser Gen. Michael Flynn.

Daisley said it’s hard to argue against critics concerned that a small number of Big Tech CEOs are becoming arbitrators of free speech.

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“I can perfectly understand [those] concerns,” he said. “It does represent the fact that we are in the singular moment that I don't think any of us enjoys being in and could never have predicted.”