Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's 'cancer free'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's beaten cancer.

Continue Reading Below

The 86-year old justice, popularly known as RBG, was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993 and has accumulated a net worth of more than $4 million as of 2017, according to The Center for Public Integrity.

"I'm cancer-free. That's good," Ginsburg said in a comprehensive interview with CNN. The justice has survived four rounds of cancer treatment since 1999 when she was first diagnosed with colon cancer.

GINSBURG DONATING $1M PRIZE TO CHARITY

Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives to watch President Barack Obama's State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Jan. 20, 2015. (REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ginsburg fell and broke three ribs in November of last year, leading many to believe that she might consider retirement, but she went back to work by the end of the month. Her salary as an associate justice is $255,300.

Doctors later discovered two malignant lesions in December while observing CT scan images of her ribs and removed them. Ginsburg missed several weeks in court but returned in time to finish the term in June.

RUTH BADER GINSBURG SAYS SHE'S WORKING THROUGH THE PAIN ONE WEEK AFTER PANCREATIC CANCER SURGERY

Most recently, Ginsburg was treated for a tumor on her pancreas in August and has been working since.

The Supreme Court did not immediately respond to FOX Business' request for comment.

The Supreme Court justices. (Fred Schilling, Supreme Court Curator's Office)

Only 9.3 percent of the general population diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survives five years or more after being diagnosed. The survival rate for patients with localized pancreatic cancer, meaning pancreatic cancer that does not spread to other areas of the body, is 37.4 percent, according to The National Cancer Institute.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

The rate of general cancer mortality in the U.S. has dropped 27 percent over the last 25 years, highlighting major achievements in cancer treatments and detecting early signs of the disease. The cancer mortality rate also dropped 2.2 percent from 2016 to 2017 -- the largest one-year decline in history, the American Cancer Society reported in January.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS