Airline catering workers demonstrate at major airports amid Thanksgiving travel

With millions of people expected to travel this Thanksgiving holiday – and a swath of inclement weather headed toward parts of the country – another challenge could face travelers: protests.

Continue Reading Below

Thousands of subcontracted airline catering workers were expected to demonstrate in 17 cities across the country Tuesday to bring attention to a slew of demands like increased pay and better benefits – including health care benefits.

Some of the protesters were expected to stage sit-ins, while others were planning to picket.

According to Unite Here, about 25 percent of subcontracted food workers for LSG Sky Chefs and Gate Gourmet earn less than $12 per hour – even some who have been in their jobs for more than 10 years. Unite Here represents about 50,000 airline industry workers, including 20,000 in catering and 30,000 in concessions.

AIRLINE CATERING WORKERS TO DEMONSTRATE AT 18 AIRPORTS DURING THANKSGIVING TRAVEL

TOP UAW OFFICIAL RESIGNS AMID CHARGES IN FEDERAL CORRUPTION INVESTIGATION

The protests are not meant to disrupt travel, just to generate publicity.

There have been numerous strikes this year across a number of industries – like auto and education. The United Auto Workers walked off General Motors plants for about 40 days earlier this year as they fought for better wages and benefits.

Meanwhile, a number of teachers’ unions have also held strikes. The Chicago teachers' union held a strike in October, affecting nearly 400,000 students. Those negotiations included calls for a cap on class sizes as well as increased support staff and more overall resources.

Los Angeles teachers from one of the nation’s largest school districts went on strike in January – for the first time in three decades.

Many of the 2020 Democratic candidates have voiced support for labor unions – specifically Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS 

FOX Business’ Grady Trimble contributed to this report.