Millennial farmer turned YouTube influencer gives behind-the-scenes look at agriculture

Showing the day-to-day process behind farming through social media

When it comes to farming, fifth-generation farmer Zach Johnson said there's a lot of misinformation out there. He wanted to help stop that, so he launched his Millennial Farmer YouTube channel.

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"I had the idea of putting my farm life out there, just to try to relate to people about what we do on our farms and really be transparent about what goes on in the day-to-day management of the business," Johnson told FOX Business' Cheryl Casone on Friday.

After about a year and a half, Johnson said it was just a hobby until a few of his videos around harvest time in 2017 went viral. Since then, it's grown, he said.

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"My wife and I put a lot of time and effort into it, and it just keeps building," Johnson said on "Mornings With Maria."

"I think it's an interesting way for a lot of people who don't have another way to see from the inside how a farm works."

- Zach Johnson, fifth-generation farmer

Johnson said he tries to take his YouTube viewers inside what it's like on a farm.

"When people drive down the interstate, they see the farmers out there working, and they have a lot of questions," Johnson said. "I think it's an interesting way for a lot of people who don't have another way to see from the inside how a farm works. It's a good way for them to really see directly from a farmer, from myself, from our family that lives out here on the farm and does this every day. It's a good way for them to see how that works."

Johnson tries to be up front in his videos, even when the weather in Minnesota is brutal.

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"Obviously, with any farmer, anytime you're farming, the weather is a concern," Johnson said. "It's the No. 1 thing, but up here, in Minnesota where we're at, we can grow really good corn, but we have a short season to do it."

"I had the idea of putting my farm life out there, just to try to relate to people about what we do on our farms and really be transparent about what goes on in the day-to-day management of the business."

- Zach Johnson, fifth-generation farmer

Because of that harsh winter weather, Johnson said farmers have to work as many days in the spring as they can in order to get the most out of their work.

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