Salmonella outbreak infects 125 Americans in the last month: CDC

Bacterial illness has spread throughout 15 U.S. states

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced it has discovered an outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport, which has resulted in 125 cases in 15 states as of Tuesday afternoon.

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The infections date to June 19 and have fluctuated in recent weeks, according to the CDC’s published Timeline of Reported Cases page. The bacterial illness peaked at 13 confirmed infections on three different days, including June 30, July 3 and July 4.

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“Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks,” the CDC noted due to its bar graph not having data available from July 9 to July 21.

An updated map of the states that currently have recorded Salmonella Newport infections includes California, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Oregon has the most confirmed infections with 42 cases. Utah has 28, Michigan has 12 and Montana has 11. The rest of the states on the list are in the single digits.

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The States with discovered Salmonella Newport strains

  • California: 3
  • Illinois: 1
  • Iowa: 3
  • Michigan: 12
  • Minnesota: 3
  • Missouri: 2
  • Montana: 11
  • North Carolina: 3
  • Ohio: 5
  • Oregon: 42
  • Tennessee: 1
  • Utah: 28
  • Washington: 1
  • Wisconsin: 1
  • Wyoming: 9

Salmonella infections most commonly cause diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps that can last anywhere between six hours and six days after being exposed to the bacteria, the CDC warned. However, the illness typically lasts four to seven days. Most people reportedly recover without treatment.

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For severe cases, hospitalization may be required. Children, seniors and immunocompromised individuals are most at risk.

The CDC is investigating the cause of this outbreak.

“A specific food item, grocery store, or restaurant chain has not been identified as the source of infections,” the agency wrote in a statement.

Common salmonella culprits include raw meat, poultry, seafood, and backyard poultry or small pet turtles.

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