Uber riders with 'significantly below average' ratings can now be kicked off app

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Uber riders, beware: Those who have way less than five stars on the app could lose their riding privileges in the near future.

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The transport company updated its community guidelines early Wednesday, sending passengers in the U.S. and Canada an alert that states the service's expectations — for both drivers and riders alike. Every rider must read and agree to the updated guidelines before using the app.

Some Uber accounts could be deactivated if they don't improve their low ratings, the company warned.

"Riders may lose access to Uber if they develop a significantly below average rating," Uber's head of safety brand and initiatives Kate Parker explained in a blog post.

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But it's possible to get back in Uber's good graces.

"Riders will have several opportunities to improve their rating prior to losing access to the Uber apps," Parker added. "Riders will receive tips on how to improve their ratings, such as encouraging polite behavior, avoiding leaving trash in the vehicle and avoiding requests for drivers to exceed the speed limit."

According to Mashable, these new rules are already in place in Australia, New Zealand and India. And Uber drivers have long been expected to meet "a minimum rating threshold," which varies based on location.

So, it's only fair to hold unruly passengers accountable, too, Uber said.

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"While we expect only a small number of riders to ultimately be impacted by ratings-based deactivations, it’s the right thing to do," said Parker, noting the company would be launching a campaign to educate users about its revamped protocol.

The ride-sharing giant had a disappointing stock market debut earlier this month. Uber's stock fell 10 percent and hovered around $37 on its first full day of trading.

Uber's revenue last year surged 42 percent to $11.3 billion, but the company admits it could be years before it turns a profit.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.