Former McDonald's CEO plans to 'live forever' by eating fast food every day

By Food and BeverageFOXBusiness

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Former McDonald’s CEO Ed Rensi plans to live forever – and he’s going to do it while chomping down on fast food.

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McDonald’s on Wednesday announced that it’s removing all artificial preservatives, flavors and colors from most of its burgers in 14,000 of its U.S.-based restaurants.

Rensi, who spent more than three decades at McDonalds before becoming the chairman of FAT brands, said he thinks it’s a good idea because it allows the fast-food chain to evolve with customers.

“We are getting smarter and wiser everyday about what we are putting into our bodies, what we are doing to the environment. McDonald’s and FAT Brands [are] doing the same thing,” he said on Thursday during an interview with FOX Business’ Maria Bartiromo. “Everybody is looking very hard at being as clean and as natural as it can possibly be, because it’s good for our people. I love it, I applaud it, I hope everybody does it and I want to live forever. I eat at McDonald’s every day and I eat at FAT Brands every day. I love it.”

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And while Rensi doesn’t expect the ingredient changes to hurt his wallet, his only concern involves production.

“The only issue really is distribution,” he said. “In a chain of distribution over time for perishable goods, as you tighten up the supply chain and you get closer and closer to the farm the easier it is to manage that.”

“So I don’t think it’s going to be more expensive. I think it’s going to be better for you and by the way, if it is more expensive I think people are willing to pay the price for quality.”

TickerSecurityLastChange%Chg
MCDMCDONALD'S CORP.186.46+2.98+1.63%
FATFAT BRANDS INC.5.28-0.12-2.31%

McDonald’s has taken a number of steps in the past year to boost sales and its public image, including hiring a new CEO and revamping its menu.

U.S. same-store sales of 2.6 percent in the second quarter fell short of analyst estimates.