Baby boomers are less likely than millennials to order groceries online

Baby Boomers have been slow to adopt grocery delivery services and online ordering, which has increased shopper convenience, especially when compared to younger generations, a new survey shows.

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The survey, which was conducted by the advertising platform Criteo and involved 1,000 U.S. consumers, asked participants about their online grocery delivery service use, with the results showing that with each generation, there is less and less likelihood of using them.

Forty-eight percent of millennials and Gen Z survey-takers said they do use some form of online grocery delivery services, like Amazon Fresh, Stop & Shop’s Peapod, Instacart and Walmart InHome.

The next generation, Gen X, responded with only 37 percent when it comes to ordering their groceries online.

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Baby boomers, the eldest of the three generations involved in the survey, who are least likely to order groceries online. Only 30 percent of respondents claim to have used such services.

Twenty-three percent of Gen Z and millennials said they browse different websites for a better selection, compared to 20 percent of Gen X and just 10 percent of baby boomers.

Gen Z and millennial respondents also seem to value the ability to gather more product information, with 18 percent of younger consumers saying they want more product information, compared to only 7 percent of Gen X and 6 percent of baby boomers.

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However, one thing all consumers seemed to agree on was that comparing shipping options was of little priority. Only 8 percent of Gen Z and millennials said it was important, 3 percent of Gen X and 2 percent of baby boomers thought comparative shipping was important.

To be sure, mobile-only sales make up 26 percent of all digital U.S. grocery sales, beauty and healthcare were both significantly over-represented when it comes to mobile share of digital grocery sales, accounting for 37 percent and 31 percent respectively of products ordered through an online grocery delivery service, according to Criteo's survey results.

Amazon Fresh delivery vans are parked at an Amazon Fresh warehouse in Inglewood, California, June 14, 2013.

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Last year, the online grocery market was valued at $632 billion, with the market value doubling between 2016 and 2018, according to this year's Business Insider Online Grocery Report. That report revealed a total of 10 percent of U.S. consumers who regularly shop for groceries online, which makes for a small portion of the larger grocery market overall.

However, the online grocery market is on a rapid rise, the annual report notes, with established players in the grocery industry and newcomers getting into the industry in an effort to get a part of the market share.

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