Google seeks FCC approval to test 6GHz network

The search giant cites the 'highly sensitive and confidential' nature of the tech in a redacted filing

Google is attempting to test a 6GHz network in 17 different states.

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For what, exactly, remains a mystery.

A batch of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) filings reviewed by Business Insider sketched out the search giant's plans without describing the nature of any product or service it might be developing.

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In a redacted letter seeking authorization for the tests, Google said it wants to experiment with the 6GHz spectrum in order to “produce technical information relevant to the utility of these frequencies for providing reliable broadband connections."

The tests are expected to take place over 24 months and the company has requested permission to conduct them in 26 different cities and towns across the country.

The states listed include Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Virginia.

(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The FCC opened the 6Ghz spectrum to unlicensed use for Wi-Fi in April, and the first Wi-Fi 6E consumer devices are expected to arrive later this year.

The Mountain View, Calif.- based company makes a point of citing the "highly sensitive and confidential” nature of the technology that’s “expected to lead to material developments in markets subject to competition from multiple U.S. and non-U.S. third parties."

The Verge hypothesized Monday that Google wanted to test a home Internet service, a "potential future offering under the Google Fiber Webpass banner."

Additionally, the outlet notes, Wi-Fi 6E routers and vehicle-to-vehicle communication might run at 6GHz. Plus, the latest 5G specifications suggest unlicensed 6GHz spectrum could be used for 5G cellular networks.

The 6GHz spectrum is expected to allow for faster and more reliable connections, though they likely will have a shorter range than those available now.

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