Elon Musk just took swipe at 'woke' culture: 'Battle for the Moral High Ground'

A 'Woketopia' would be a 'woke utopia' brought on by cancel culture

Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk poked fun at woke culture Saturday, tweeting about a “new game” called “Woketopia.”

“Battle for the Moral High Ground in this new game!” he wrote.

It’s unclear what prompted the tweet, but Musk has faced criticism over his questioning of the COVID-19 vaccine this weekend and newly released documents showing the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif., saw hundreds of coronavirus cases after he reopened it in defiance of a local shutdown order.

In this Dec. 1, 2020, file photo, SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk arrives on the red carpet for the Axel Springer media award, in Berlin. Tesla says it has invested more than $1 billion in Bitcoin and will accept the digital currency as payment

TESLA'S FREMONT FACTORY SAW OVER 400 COVID-19 CASES BETWEEN MAY, DECEMBER: NEW DOCUMENTS

He’s also facing a lawsuit from a Tesla investor who alleges Musk’s “erratic tweets” are violating his fiduciary duty as CEO.

The “Woketopia” proposal garnered mixed reactions from some in the tech crowd.

“That would actually be an interesting game to design,” wrote the computer scientist Paul Graham.

But game designer Tyler Glaiel mockingly replied, “ok boomer.”

The term has been used by conservatives derisively to describe a "woke utopia" that they say liberals are seeking to establish through cancel culture.

Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz has suggested that Seattle, with its "defunded" police department and frequent Antifa demonstrations, already fits the description.

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Musk credited computer games for introducing himself and other leading software engineers into computer programming during a speech in 2019 at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles – the world’s leading gaming convention.

“I think video games are a very powerful force for getting young kids interested in technology,” he said at the time.

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In 1984 at 12 years old, one of his earliest entrepreneurial ventures was to code a video game called “Blastar,” which he sold for $500 to PC and Office Technology magazine. You can play a version of it here.