Pro-life tech leaders court Texas Right to Life after GoDaddy drops domain hosting for whistleblower site

The web hosting giant cut service for the whistleblower site, alleging that it violated a policy on gathering information without the subject’s consent

Texas Right to Life was working with pro-life business leaders to transfer its whistleblower site to a new host Saturday, a day after GoDaddy shut it down amid alleged violations of its policy.

The web hosting giant cut service for the whistleblower site, not Texas Right to Life’s main domain, on Friday, alleging that it violated a policy on gathering information without the subject’s consent.

Texas Right to Life set up Prolifewhistleblower.com to help users report violations of Texas’ new heartbeat law, which took effect Wednesday and allows anyone to sue if an abortion is conducted after cardiac activity can be detected. 

A four dimensional ultrasound is seen at a pregnancy clinic in Arlington, Texas November 26, 2007. The clinic offers free services to what it deems are "vulnerable women" considering an abortion. Part of a program called "Option Ultrasound," sponsore

GoDaddy’s decision came after the website faced intense criticism from pro-choice activists. But the new law has saved about 150 lives a day, according to Texas Right to Life’s vice president, Elizabeth Graham.

GODADDY STOPS SERVICE FOR TEXAS ANTI-ABORTION GROUP'S WHISTLEBLOWER WEBSITE

And the pro-life group’s lawyers have found multiple instances in which it was actually GoDaddy that violated its own policy, she told FOX Business Saturday.

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"They're looking into it, and at some point they'll tell us, if we should take action or if we should just move on and be satisfied with getting out of GoDaddy," she said.

The site, prolifewhistleblower.com, was accessible briefly Saturday afternoon but appeared out of service during multiple visits later in the day. Staffers have been the target of vulgar, angry emails and phone messages, Graham said, as well as hacking, spamming and trolling attempts. One caller allegedly told the group’s pregnant, newlywed receptionist that she hoped she’d suffer a miscarriage.

But those attempts at disruption, Graham said, have led Texas Right to Life to double down on its efforts.

"Abortion not only hurts the child, but really can have devastating effects on the mother," she said. 

Graham said the nonprofit’s I.T. director was in touch with more than one alternative hosting company whose leaders support the pro-life movement. She also said she expected that some pro-life and conservative groups who currently use GoDaddy would migrate elsewhere.

"A number of people reached out to us and said, let us know where you're going because we want to go there, too," she said.

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But she also said she could not yet tell FOX Business which company would be the new host.

Texas’s new law outlawed abortions once medical professionals can detect a fetal heartbeat, usually around six weeks into a pregnancy and before many women know they are pregnant. The law is the most restrictive abortion measure since the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling in 1973. It also allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone they suspect may have helped skirt the law for at least $10,000 in damages.

However, a Texas judge temporarily shielded Planned Parenthood clinics in the Lone Star State from being sued by Texas Right to Life and dozens of individuals Friday.

FOX Business’ Thomas Barrabi contributed to this report.