Ozzy Osbourne reveals Parkinson’s disease diagnosis. Here’s how much the disease costs

Parkinson’s disease costs the U.S. about $51.9B every year, according to one study

Rock legend Ozzy Osbourne revealed on Tuesday that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

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In an interview with “Good Morning America” host Robin Roberts, the 71-year-old former Black Sabbath lead singer said the diagnosis came last year after he fell in the bathroom.

Parkinson’s disease is a nervous system disorder that affects movement and can cause tremors, limb rigidity, gait and balance issues and slowness of movement.

Ozzy Osbourne performs at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles on Nov. 24, 2019. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

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Though there isn’t a cure for Parkinson’s, patients can be treated with medications or surgery, according to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

According to statistics from the Parkinson’s Foundation, about 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with the disease every year.

Ozzy Osbourne and his wife, Sharon Osbourne, in June 2018. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP, File)

Last summer, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) published a study on the economic burden of Parkinson’s on patients and families.

According to that study, the total cost of the disease -- to patients, families and the U.S. government -- is estimated to be $51.9 billion.

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Of that $51.9 billion, about $25.4 billion goes toward direct medical costs, including hospitalization and treatment, while $26.5 billion makes up the non-medical costs, including missed work, family caregiver time and early forced retirement, a press release about the study said.

The Parkinson’s Foundation also estimated that medications cost about $2,500 a year, while therapeutic surgery can cost $100,000 per person.

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In the “Good Morning America” interview, Sharon Osbourne said: "It's PRKN 2, which is a form of Parkinson’s. And it is --There's so many different types of Parkinson's.”

“It's not a death sentence by any stretch of the imagination, but it does affect certain nerves in your body,” she added. “And it's -- it's like you have a good day, a good day, and then a really bad day."

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Fox News’ Nate Day and The Associated Press contributed to this report.