Millennials, Gen Zers more likely to ‘ghost’ employers than older generations: Report

50% of Millennials and Gen Zers said they have completely stopped communicating with an employer to take a higher-paying job elsewhere

Younger generations are more likely than other generations to up and vanish from their jobs in pursuit of higher-paying roles elsewhere, according to one report.

Continue Reading Below

Randstad US published the results of its 2020 Compensation Insights Survey last month, which concluded that the two youngest generations in the workforce -- Millennials (ages 25-34) and Gen Z (ages 18-24) -- are willing to “ghost,” or completely stop communicating with, their employers.

According to the survey, 50 percent of Millennials and 50 percent of Gen Zers said they had “ghosted” an employer in order to accept a job somewhere else that pays a higher salary.

THESE JOBS MAKE THE MOST, LEAST IN TIPS

Meanwhile, only 35 percent of Gen Xers, 19 percent of Baby Boomers and 9 percent of Traditionalists -- also called the Silent Generation -- said they had ever “ghosted” an employer.

Millennials and Gen Zers are the most likely generations to have "ghosted" an employer for a better-paying job, according to a survey from Randstad US.

The survey also found that aside from “ghosting,” younger generations have generally bolder salary negotiation tactics.

Fifty-eight percent of Gen Zers and 59 percent of Millennials said they used a potential job offer to leverage a higher salary at their current job, while only 48 percent of Gen Xers, 29 percent of Boomers and 24 percent of Traditionalists said the same thing.

BOOMERS, MILLENNIALS, GEN XERS: WHO TIPS THE MOST

In fact, 55 percent of Millennials and Gen Zers said they have told prospective employers that they have other job offers, even though they didn’t have any.

Only 39 percent of Gen Xers, 24 percent of Boomers and 15 percent of Traditionalists said they had ever done the same.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

"We're seeing a few shifts in the way workers think about compensation,” Jim Link, chief human resources officer of Randstad North America, said in a previous statement. “While salary has always been top of mind, today people are getting increasingly more strategic and assertive in their approach to climbing the pay scale — especially younger generations.”

"This reality, coupled with a tight job market, requires employers to be more aware of their compensation offerings in order to stay competitive,” Link added.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS