Iran crash: Boeing seeks US approval to aid in investigation

The aerospace giant is working with the FAA and NTSB

Boeing said Friday it's seeking approval from U.S. officials to help with the investigation into the deadly crash of one of its 737-800 passenger jets flown by Ukraine International Airlines.

Continue Reading Below

The aerospace giant said it's working with the two federal agencies – the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board – “on the necessary applications and approvals,” Reuters reported. While the planemaker typically assists with investigations into crashes of any of its airliners, it's hindered in this case by U.S. sanctions that penalize companies doing business with the Islamic Republic.

IRAN SAYS UKRAINIAN PLANE WAS ON FIRE, TRIED TO TURN BACK

A Boeing spokesperson confirmed the company is cooperating with the NTSB, which investigates major accidents in commercial transportation services and has designated a representative to the probe.

Earlier Friday, Iran denied Western allegations that one of its own missiles downed the jetliner that crashed early Wednesday outside Tehran, hours after Iran launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two U.S. bases in Iraq to avenge the killing of its top general in an American airstrike last week. All 176 people on board the Ukraine International Airlines flight died.

TIMING OF BOEING 737 IRAN CRASH 'VERY SUSPICIOUS,' PILOT SAYS

“What is obvious for us, and what we can say with certainty, is that no missile hit the plane,” Ali Abedzadeh, head of Iran's national aviation department, told a press conference.

“If they are really sure, they should come and show their findings to the world" in accordance with international standards, he added.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said recovering data from the black box flight recorders could take more than a month and that the entire investigation could stretch into next year. He also said Iran may request help from international experts if it is not able to extract the flight recordings.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

The Associated Press contributed to this report.