Boeing 'humbled and learning' after Ethiopian Airlines crash, CEO Muilenburg says

By TransportationFOXBusiness

Boeing will be held accountable: Ralph Nader

Former presidential candidate Ralph Nader discusses how he lost his great-niece, Samya Stumo, in the Ethiopian air crash involving a Boeing 737 Max jet.

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg on Tuesday said the aviation company is “humbled and learning” in the wake of a fatal Ethiopian Airlines crash that led nations around the world to ground its 737 Max plane.

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“With a shared value of safety, be assured that we are bringing all of the resources of The Boeing Company to bear, working together tirelessly to understand what happened and do everything possible to ensure it doesn’t happen again,” Muilenburg said in an open letter posted on Boeing’s website. “All of us thank Ethiopian Airlines for their commitment and share their resolve to doing everything possible to build an even safer air travel system.”

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An Ethiopian Airlines-operated Boeing 737 Max aircraft crashed earlier this month, killing all 157 of its passengers, in an incident that bore similarities to a recent fatal Lion Air crash involving a 737 Max aircraft. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and authorities in several other countries have grounded all Boeing 737 Max planes amid inquiries related to the accidents.

Muilenburg’s letter came one day after Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam reiterated support for the embattled aviation firm and defended the training programs afforded to its pilots.

“Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. They have been a partner of ours for many years,” Gebremariam said in a press release, adding that “Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines will continue to be linked well into the future.”

Authorities have yet to definitively identify the cause of the fatal Ethiopian Airlines crash.

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A Boeing representative told Fox News that the company will be holding an informational session for “more than 200 airline pilots, technical leaders and regulators” on Wednesday regarding its plans to return the 737 Max model to service.

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