Here's how to speak to your loved ones after you die

Even after death, some people have found ways to communicate with the living using technology.

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Earlier this month, an Irish man played his final prank on his loved ones when a relative played a pre-recorded message as if he were shouting from his casket.

In a video that his daughter posted on social media -- which quickly went viral -- it appears as if Defense Forces veteran Shay Bradley is asking to be let out of the casket as his relatives laugh at the prank.

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According to his daughter, Bradley pre-recorded his message when he learned he was dying of a “long illness” and wanted to make his friends and family laugh one more time.

WARNING: VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC LANGUAGE

Aside from tape-recorded pranks, there are several other ways you can send messages to your loved ones after you die.

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Here are a few examples.

Talking Gravestones

Robert Barrows, the founder of public relations firm R.M. Barrows, has also patented the idea for “Video Enhanced Gravemarkers.”

According to the website, people will be able to record their own obituaries that visitors to their burial site can watch using a remote control.

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Digital Memory Box

According to Business News Daily, technology company Immortum helps elderly and terminally ill people record their memories on audio and video. Business News Daily reported that people could decide when they wanted their memories and messages to be delivered to their loved ones, waiting as long as 50 years after they die. Today, access to the website requires a code.

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App-Based Will 

To avoid leaving your loved ones overwhelmed by decisions to make about what to do with your belongings or how to deal with your estate, an app called After can help.

The app’s website explains that when people set up an account, they designate trustees to receive the information they provide, which can include funeral arrangements, personal messages and how to deal with belongings.

Though the app makes clear it's not meant to replace an actual will, After does help loved ones understand a person’s wishes.

Fox News’ Alexandra Deabler contributed to this report.