How deadly is coronavirus in US compared with other countries?

As of Monday, the U.S. had more than 401,100 confirmed cases

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As the U.S. continues to battle the ongoing coronavirus crisis a new analysis shows the outbreak may be particularly fatal in the country when compared with experiences elsewhere.

New research from the Cleveland Fed shows that the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. has a higher mortality rate than outbreaks in both China and South Korea. The mortality rate is similar in Europe.

Using data available as of April 5, the mortality rate in South Korea was four-per-million. It was 271-per-1 million in Spain.

In the U.S., the mortality rate was 29-per-1 million.

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“Comparing the trajectory of the COVID-19 epidemic in the United States to that of other countries can provide important insights into how the virus is progressing in the United States and the effectiveness of our response,” researcher Joel Elvery said. “This report argues that cumulative mortality rates and their percentage changes are the best available measures for comparing the trajectory of the epidemic in different countries. Based on these measures, the epidemic in the United States has a similar mortality rate to those in Europe and is more deadly than in China and South Korea.”

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Elvery noted that Italy and Spain’s outbreaks are slightly ahead of the U.S. trajectory. Italy also had a higher mortality rate when compared with the U.S.

The paper did note that there were concerns about breadth, accuracy, reporting and speed of testing, which have all varied across nations. It was also acknowledged that some countries may have unreported deaths.

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Concerns have been raised, for example, that China may have hidden or obscured data, which includes case numbers.

As of Monday, the U.S. had more than 401,100 confirmed cases. New York state – which has by far the worst domestic outbreak – had a higher number of confirmed cases than the entire country of Italy at more than 149,300.

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