Chick-fil-A pushing no cash in coronavirus

Customers are encouraged to use mobile ordering

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If you have a hankering for Chick-fil-A, make sure you have a card on hand or your smartphone.

Some of the fast-food behemoth's locations around the country are going cashless or strongly urging against that form of payment in order to protect its employees and customers from COVID-19.

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Customers are encouraged to use other methods of payment including the company's mobile app or Google and Apple Pay in order to reduce the spread of the disease via hand to hand contact, according to Facebook posts from Chick-fil-A locations in Florida, Virginia, Maryland, Indiana and Kentucky.

Chick-fil-A is now one of a growing number of establishments that have encouraged against using banknotes for fear that physical currency, handled by tens of thousands of people over their useful life, could be a vector for the spreading coronavirus.

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"We're going cashless to protect our workers as we serve you each day. The BEST way is to order and pay through our mobile app - nothing to scan or hand over to the cashier!" a Chick-fil-A location in Hampton, Virginia wrote on Facebook Monday. "Thank you for your patience and understanding as we navigate this situation."

Similarly, Chick-fil-A location in Severna Park, Maryland wrote on Facebook that it will "no longer be able to accommodate cash customers" and a location in Kentucky posted it was going cashless "until further notice."

Chick-fil-A's corporate website is also encouraging its customers to temporarily switch to mobile ordering.

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"To limit person-to-person contact, guests are encouraged to utilize mobile ordering and mobile payment through the Chick-fil-A App," Chick-fil-A's corporate website explains. "Please understand that guests paying with credit or debit will be asked to swipe their own cards, and restaurants will no longer be offering the option to enter a credit card PIN or signed receipts at this time."

While the World Health Organization did not say banknotes would transmit the disease, they say those should wash their hands after handling money, especially when handling or eating food, according to MarketWatch.

Chick-fil-A has not immediately responded to FOX Business' request to see if similar policies will be implemented at all of its restaurants.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.