What is Global Entry?

Started in 2008, it's one of five Trusted Traveler Programs administered by the Department of Homeland Security.

The Department of Homeland Security's Global Entry and related programs have expedited travel for U.S. citizens for years, but a disagreement between New York and DHS has blocked New Yorkers from using such programs.

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What perks have New Yorkers lost? Global Entry started in 2008 and is one of five Trusted Traveler Programs administered by DHS.

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Access to the Global Entry program costs $100 and includes TSA PreCheck, which is technically a separate Trusted Traveler Program. Global Entry is designed to fast-track travelers' entry process in the U.S. whether they arrive by air, land or sea.

U.S. citizens and permanent residents can apply for Global Entry, which requires a thorough background check and in-person interview. DHS says a new New York law impinges on its ability to conduct those checks.

An arriving passenger at Newark international Airport uses a Global Entry kiosk to enter the U.S. (Josh Denmark/CBP)

New York filed a lawsuit on Monday challenging DHS's decision to block New Yorkers from participating in Trusted Traveler Programs in retribution for a new state law that could hinder federal immigration enforcement, Attorney General Letitia James said.

"It's an abuse of power. It's extortion. It is hurting New Yorkers to advance their political agenda. And we're going to fight back," Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, said at a Friday news conference in New York.

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President Trump and Cuomo will meet on Thursday to discuss the issue, a White House official confirmed to FOX Business.

Cuomo is willing to compromise and share DMV info with DHS, but only the information of New Yorkers applying to such travel programs, he said on Wednesday morning.

"The Department has not yet received a proposal from the State of New York. We are only aware of media reports at this time," a DHS spokesperson told FOX Business. "The Acting Secretary has been clear that [Customs and Border Protection] requires full access to DMV data to fulfill their law enforcement, customs, and trade and travel statutory responsibilities. It remains our goal to get back to a place where New York is once again sharing critical law enforcement data with CBP."

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf explained his department's decision on "Sunday Morning Futures" with Maria Bartiromo.

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"This has nothing to do with the law that they passed regarding providing driver's licenses to illegal aliens," Wolf said. That's dangerous, but that's separate from what we did this week. New York is the only state — that bears repeating, the only state — that restricts [Customs and Border Protection] access to their DMV data across the board, not only for immigration purposes, but for law enforcement purposes."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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