Bud Light fan uses beer to save home from wildfire

With the help of firefighters, the Vacaville man was able to save his house

A California man whose home was threatened by one of the state's largest wildfires managed to salvage it with the only liquid he could find: a case of Bud Light, his beer of choice.

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Vacaville native Chad Little and his family were preparing to evacuate last week when he decided to make a final attempt to fend off the LNU Lightning Complex Fire, according to local NBC affiliate KCRA.

Little -- in the process of rebuilding the house, which was destroyed by an attic fire five years ago -- initially tried to use water from a hose but soon realized his utilities had already been shut off.

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The only other liquid he had was a 30-pack of Bud Light.

Reportedly using a nail to puncture the cans, Little began shaking them and spraying out their contents to smother the flames.

Eventually, firefighters responded and were able to extinguish the flames on his property, The Mercury News later reported.

Little told The Vacaville Reporter that's when he breathed “a sigh of relief."

His cars, including an antique, were all damaged, but the house remained untouched.

"My buddies all tease me about drinking water beer, and I say, ‘Hey, saved my shop,' " he told KCRA.

Since then, Little has been helping his neighbors by piping in Solano Irrigation District water to run up to other properties and put out hot spots.

“[It’s] eye-opening what nature can do and how little we are,” he told The Reporter.

On Monday, Anheuser-Busch's Bud Light tweeted out a response to Little's story.

"Adding 'part time firefighter' to our resume," the brewer wrote.

Although Little was able to hold the fire at bay, Cal Fire does not recommend others try what he did.

"We always recommend that if you're under a mandatory evacuation, you leave right away," LNU Lightning Complex Fire spokesman Steve Concialdi told Fox Business on Thursday. "Fire can move quickly and the hot gases can [easily] get into your lungs -- the heat and the smoke -- and can cause irreversible lung damage."

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Little had "very good intentions because he was trying to help his community," he continued. "But, the safety of himself, family, and friends is of utmost importance and we never want somebody to get hurt or killed trying to fight a fire because of the hot smoke and gases."

The LNU Lightning Complex is the second-largest fire in California history. According to Cal Fire, the blaze is now 33% contained and has burned over 368,868 acres.