Bought a haunted house? Join the club

By Real EstateFOXBusiness

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Have dreams of living in the LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans or maybe Lizzie Borden’s house in Fall River, Massachusetts?

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You may not be alone.

According to realtor.com’s annual Haunted Real Estate report, one in three people — especially millennials — are willing to take a chance on a haunted house. The only caveat? The realtor needs to throw in a little something to sweeten deal.

Topping that wish list, according to the report, was a big discount at 15 percent, followed by a tie of either a larger kitchen or a better neighborhood at 9 percent.

Out of all demographics, millennials were the most price sensitive with 17 percent persuadable by a lower price tag despite the added, unwanted company.

Yet, the most surprising statistic was that 18 percent of those polled said they wouldn’t require any additional features in order to be persuaded into the spooky decor. In fact, nearly a quarter of those aged 35-54 said they wouldn’t be affected by the haunted nature of the home with making a purchase decision.

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However, for the remaining 49 percent, they said there’s no price low enough or kitchen large enough to make them set up shop in a haunted house. The older generation in particular was the most reluctant, with 61 percent over the age of 55 tossing the idea out, opposed to 41 percent of millennials and Gen Xers.

What’s more, the report found that living in a haunted home is more common than most think. Nearly two in five people believe they have live in one, with 44 percent of them saying they were fully aware it was haunted before moving in.

So, what constitutes as haunted? Hearing strange noises at 54 percent topped the list, followed by odd feelings in certain rooms at 45 percent and erratic pet behavior at 34 percent.

The scariest part of all? Nearly 17 percent of sellers admitted they failed to tell buyers that the house was haunted during the buying process.

“In a competitive market, it’s harder for prospective buyers to be extremely selective,” Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com said. “If a house is commensurately priced, or has desirable features, the fact that it may be haunted seems to matter less.”