Alex Rodriguez visits 'mentor' Warren Buffett, hails him as 'embodiment of American values'

By Warren BuffettFOXBusiness

Alex Rodriguez on the use of analytics in baseball

Former Yankees third baseman and current FOX Sports analyst Alex Rodriguez discusses the 2018 MLB All-Star Game and how analytics have changed the game of baseball.

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez shared a snap of himself enjoying a sweet treat with his “mentor,” Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett.

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The former New York Yankees slugger turned baseball analyst met up with Buffett on Omaha and appeared inspired by their meeting. Rodriguez hailed Buffett as the “embodiment of American values.”

“61 years in the same house,” Rodriguez wrote. “57 years in the same office building. Bought his first shares of Berkshire Hathaway in 1962.”

He noted Buffett had pledged most of his billions to philanthropy and described the takeaways he learned from the billionaire.

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“You need one good idea every five years,” Rodriguez noted. “Don’t listen to all the noise. Stay focused. Be patient. But when you get your deal, you have to have the courage to take a big swing. No singles. Home runs.”

Rodriguez said in a recent interview with The New York Times that he viewed Warren Buffett as a role model in the business world.

“Think about what Jamie Dimon has done at J.P. Morgan. Barry Sternlicht at Starwood. Jon Gray at Blackstone. Obviously, our Babe Ruth is Warren Buffett,” he said.

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Rodriguez has an interesting business portfolio outside of sports.

In 2003, he founded the investment firm A-Rod Corp. His namesake agency manages investments across multilevel industries, including entertainment, media, sports, wellness and real estate with 13,000 units across ten states. He also founded real-estate development firm Newport Property Construction in 2008.

“I started with real estate, and I started truly out of fear,” Rodriguez said in an interview with FOX Business’ Charles Gasparino last year. “I kept looking at the numbers, and the career average is about five and a half years and you see where most athletes make 80 percent or 90 percent of their money between age 20 and 30.”

Fox Business’ Henry Fernandez contributed to this report.