A Wal-Mart employee pushes a line of shopping carts toward the entrance of a Wal-Mart store, in Walpole, Mass., Friday, May 11, 2007. As retailers released their April sales figures, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. recorded a rare drop, the weakest performance since the world's largest retailer began publishing monthly sales in 1980, according to John Simley, a company spokesman. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A Wal-Mart employee pushes a line of shopping carts toward the entrance of a store, in Walpole, Mass. (AP/File)

Wal-Mart Pulls Enfamil Baby Formula After Newborn Dies

By Features FOXBusiness

Wal-Mart (WMT) has pulled a batch of powdered infant formula from more than 3,000 stores after a newborn boy in Missouri died shortly after taking the Enfamil formula.

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The world’s largest retailer said preliminary tests indicate the baby died from a rare bacterial infection and it is pulling the batch of formula as a precautionary measure. 

The government has not ordered a recall of the 12.5-ounce cans of Enfamil Newborn powder with the lot number ZP1K7G and manufacturer Mead Johnson Nutrition said its records show the lot tested negative for the bacteria before it was shipped.

A Wal-Mart spokesperson said the company pulled the lot out of caution while authorities investigate Sunday’s death of 10-day-old Avery Cornett. Depending on the outcome, the product could end up back on shelves, though customers of that specific batch might be allowed to return them to Wal-Mart stores for a refund or exchange.

Samples of the formula have been sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for testing, according to the associated press, citing a spokeswoman for the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.  

The Missouri health department advises parents to follow World Health Organization guidelines for safely preparing powered infant formula, including washing hands with soap and water, thoroughly sterilizing all feeding equipment in hot, soapy water and preparing enough formula for just one feeding at a time.