Elizabeth Warren, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey spar over political ad ban

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren exchanged words with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Tuesday after she criticized the social media platform over elements of its recent decision to ban political advertisements.

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Dorsey announced on Oct. 30 that Twitter would stop all paid advertisements for both political candidates and political issues because the company “[believes] political message reach should be earned, not bought.” In a series of tweets on Tuesday, Warren argued that Twitter’s policy change was flawed.

TWITTER BANS POLITICAL ADS AHEAD OF 2020 ELECTION

“Twitter's new ad policy will allow fossil fuel companies to buy ads defending themselves and spreading misleading info—but won't allow organizations fighting the climate crisis to buy ads holding those companies accountable,” Warren wrote. “We need accountability.”

Warren added: “It turns out if you’re a giant corporation with millions to spend misleading people on your record of accelerating the climate crisis, that’s exactly what you can – and probably will – do.”

Warren’s tweets drew a response from Dorsey, who noted that Twitter had yet to release full details for its policy governing political advertisements and what would and would not be permitted.

“We haven’t announced our new rules yet. They come out 11/15. Taking all this into consideration,” Dorsey wrote.

Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for further comment on the situation.

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Warren has repeatedly targeted tech leaders during her campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. The Massachusetts Senator unveiled plans earlier this year to break up tech giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Google by unwinding what she called “anti-competitive” mergers and business practices.

All three tech firms were currently facing probes from federal antitrust officials.

Last month, Twitter legal, policy and trust and safety lead Vijaya Gadde said the company defined political issue advertisements as “ads that refer to an election or a candidate or ads that advocate for or against legislative issues of national importance (such as: climate change, healthcare, immigration, national security, taxes).”

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