Girls soccer head injury, concussion risk nearly matches football: Study

High injury risk in sports, especially football, has been heavily discussed and disputed. However, a recent study revealed that football might not be the only injury-prone sport to worry about.

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According to a study published in the journal Pediatrics, the risk of head injuries in girls soccer nearly matches that of boys football. Boys football had the highest rate of concussion, while girls soccer was second, at a rate of eight per 10,000 events, including practices and games.

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Family medicine doctor Dr. Mikhail Varshavski, also known as Dr. Mike, said this is something that needs to be talked about.

“We don't have an answer for it," Dr. Mike FOX Business’s Maria Bartiromo. "Speculation comes from: Is it because of anatomy? Do boys have stronger necks and therefore are more resilient to these forces? Is there a hormonal issue? Is it the fact that female athletes are more likely to report these concussions?”

Netherlands' Desiree Van Lunteren, left, and United States' Megan Rapinoe play in the Women's World Cup final soccer match in Decines, France, Sunday, July 7, 2019. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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There is, however, medical research being made on how to prevent and reduce concussion rates in sports, Dr. Mike said.

“There are specific exercises that we're studying to see if they reduce the rates of concussion,” he said. “Specifically in studying how our visual system can better prepare us for a hit, whether it means better fall, a better collision with another player or a soccer ball.”

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Aside from these rates and risks, Dr. Mike said these numbers should not dissuade kids from playing sports or parents from allowing it.

“We need our kids to stay active,” he said. ”Screen time is going up and activities are going down. So this is not meant to be a reason to keep your kids from sports.”

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