Crowded school system considers year-round schedule. Here's how that could cost teachers

Wake County, North Carolina, is deciding whether to make the change

A crowded school system in Wake County, North Carolina, will decide Tuesday whether to bump up the number of students on a year-round schedule, much to some parents' chagrin.

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Teachers could stand to lose, too, if more of them are required to give up their summer breaks.

DON'T TELL THE KIDS: THIS BILL WOULD KEEP THEM AT SCHOOL EVEN LONGER

The school board of Wake County, home to state capital Raleigh, will vote on a new student assignment plan that could switch many of its students to a year-round schedule. The school system has 160,000 students, a growth of 60 percent since 2000, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Many families who want to keep their elementary students on a traditional schedule spoke out at a public hearing in November, The Raleigh News & Observer reported.

"We chose traditional school for a reason, for my kid," parent Priya Lingam of Apex, North Carolina, said, according to The News & Observer. "It works well for her. I take her on summer vacation."

Proponents of the assignment plan say it will better spread out students among new and under-enrolled schools. Many parents, however, complain that going year-round will put their children on different schedules, putting stress on their wallets and calendars.

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Teachers will also be affected. Losing summer break makes it harder for teachers to work a second job when the school year is wound down. Teachers who work at year-round schools who have children at traditional schools (or vice versa) could struggle to find child care, too.

Without the summer break, teachers could see increased burnout rates, too.

Meanwhile, technology has the ability to transform classrooms in ways not yet anticipated. Khan Academy founder Sal Khan advocated for students spending more time in school while speaking with FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo on "Wall Street Week" in August.

"Over the summer ... if your kid's entering into eighth grade, go to Khan Academy and get them started on that eighth-grade material before they show up at school," Khan said.

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