Republican vs. Democratic stimulus bills: Comparing the money Americans could receive

While there are some similarities between 2 packages, they're markedly different in several key ways

Pressure is mounting on Congress and the Trump administration to negotiate another emergency aid package as a resurgence in coronavirus cases and a fresh round of business shutdowns threaten to reverse the economy's nascent recovery.

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But Democrats and Republicans appear to remain at odds over what measures need to be included in what will be the fifth stimulus bill.

CALCULATE HOW MUCH MONEY YOU'D RECEIVE FROM THE SECOND STIMULUS CHECK HERE

"I'm not optimistic that we'll reach any kind of comprehensive deal," White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows told reporters on Capitol Hill Wednesday evening.

The two sides have each endorsed their own bill: In May, House Democrats passed the $3.5 trillion HEROES Act, and on Monday, Senate Republicans -- delayed for days by party infighting -- unveiled the HEALS Act, estimated to cost around $1 trillion.

While there are some similarities between the two packages, they're markedly different in several key ways; the Democratic plan seeks about $1 trillion in aid for states and cities, $200 billion for rental assistance and mortgage relief and additional aid for food assistance. The more narrowly crafted Republican plan, meanwhile, emphasizes liability shields for businesses and skips financial assistance for state and local governments.

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Here's a closer look at the proposals and how much money Americans still reeling from the pandemic could receive under each one.

Unemployment

The plans take a vastly different approach on unemployment aid, with Republicans proposing extending -- but curtailing -- the sweetened benefits. Conservatives have argued the $600-per-week supplement adopted earlier this year as part of the CARES Act actually disincentivized some out-of-work Americans from returning to their jobs.

Republicans and the White House called for scaling back the extra payment to $200 a week until states can adopt a more complicated system that would cap the aid at 70 percent of the income workers received before they lost their jobs. It's unclear how long it would take states to phase in the new system; some states have said it could take months.

A SECOND STIMULUS CHECK IS LIKELY - AND 26M MORE PEOPLE MIGHT GET CASH THS ROUND

Democrats, meanwhile, want to extend the $600 weekly payments through January.

More than 30 million Americans, or roughly one in five workers, are collecting the financial support, according to Labor Department data.

Stimulus checks

Both proposals would allocate another round of $1,200 direct payments to American families, with the necessary qualifications nearly identical to the first stimulus check.

In both the HEALS Act and HEROES Act, individuals who earn a gross adjusted income of up to $75,000 and couples earning $150,000 would receive the full $1,200 or $2,400 payments, respectively. For higher earners, the checks will be reduced by $5 for every $100 in income and phased out entirely at $99,000 and $198,000.

However, the Democratic proposal would allow undocumented immigrants to receive the money, removing language that prohibited payments from going to anyone who filed taxes jointly with someone who used an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number.

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Democrats would also increase the amount of money per child to $1,200 for up to three children, meaning that families could receive a maximum of $6,000 from the government.

The Republican proposal would keep the $500 amount for dependents established in the CARES Act but would modify it so families with dependents over the age of 17 will be able to receive the extra cash.

It's unclear whether the HEALS Act has a limit on how many dependent payments a single household can receive.

About 96 million dependents would be eligible for a payment, 26 million more than the number of dependents eligible under the CARES Act, according to the Tax Foundation.

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