Goldman responds to gender discrimination allegations involving the Apple Card

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and entrepreneur David Heinemeier Hansson say they each were allowed larger credit limits than their wives.

Goldman Sachs is responding following some high profile allegations concerning gender discrimination involving the Apple Card.

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Both Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and entrepreneur and web developer David Heinemeier Hansson made the allegations saying they each were allowed credit limits that were many times larger than those given to their wives.

Goldman said Apple Card applicants are evaluated independently, using income, creditworthiness and other factors including personal credit scores and personal debt. based on that, two family members could have different credit decisions.

Apple launched the card in August in a partnership with Goldman Sachs.

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Hansson said the card offered him a credit limit 20 times greater than it gave to his wife, even though she has a higher credit score. He called the algorithm a sexist program.

FILE- In this Monday, March 25, 2019, file photo, Jennifer Bailey, vice president of Apple Pay, speaks about the Apple Card at the Steve Jobs Theater during an event to announce new products in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar, File)

Wozniak added he received a limit 10 times more than his wife.

A New York regulator is investigating Goldman Sachs for possible sex discrimination in the way it sets credit limits.

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The agency is "troubled to learn of potential discriminatory treatment in regards to credit limit decisions reportedly made by an algorithm of Apple Card, issued by Goldman Sachs," said spokeswoman Sophia Kim. She said the department "will be conducting an investigation to determine whether New York law was violated and ensure all consumers are treated equally regardless of sex."

The Associated Press contributed to this article.