Vermont releases draft GMO labeling rules ahead of public hearings

Associated Press

The Vermont attorney general's office on Wednesday released a draft of the rules it is writing to govern the state's first-in-the-nation law to require the labeling of food made with genetically modified organisms.

The nine pages of rules lay out everything from definitions of "food" and "genetic engineering" to the required disclosures that will read "Produced with Genetic Engineering" or "Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering."

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Three public hearings have been scheduled for next week so people can offer their opinions on the law. Comments can also be submitted by email.

Attorney General William Sorrell said his office was moving to write the rules as quickly as possible so the industry would be prepared before the law takes effect in 2016.

"We're on track to have this rule in a proposed final form by the end of this year or very, very early next year so that we have gotten it all done by sometime, hopefully, next spring," Sorrell said.

Gov. Peter Shumlin signed the law in May. Proponents say it's needed so consumers will know what's in the food they eat.

Critics say GMO foods are safe. The Grocery Manufacturers Association and other industry groups have filed a federal lawsuit to block the law, which it described as "a costly and misguided measure."

The association said Wednesday in a statement that it was reviewing the draft rules and would provide "detailed feedback to the state at the appropriate time."

The state began a defense fund to help defray the legal costs of the lawsuit. The fund has about $300,000.

The law calls for the labeling of processed GMO foods and for retailers to post signs on displays of unpackaged genetically engineered foods. Violations could be subject to a civil penalty of $1,000 per day. Restaurants would be exempt from the requirements.

The public hearings are scheduled for Tuesday in Burlington, Wednesday in Montpelier and Friday in Brattleboro.