First peanut allergy treatment approved by FDA

Aimmune Therapeutics hopes to achieve the ability for children to be 'protected' from accidental exposure to peanuts

Children who have serious peanut allergies could soon have some relief as the Food and Drug Administration approved a new treatment that will help their bodies become more tolerant of the legume.

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The drug, taken orally, is approved for patients with a confirmed diagnosis of peanut allergy, according to Aimmune Therapeutics, the biopharmaceutical company responsible for developing the treatment. However, the drug is not designed as an emergency treatment of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, the company said. Users of the drug must still avoid the consumption of peanuts.

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TickerSecurityLastChangeChange %
AIMTAIMMUNE THERAPEUTICS34.50-0.07-0.20%

Aimmune Therapeutics CEO Dr. Jayson Dallas told FOX Business’ Maria Bartiromo that initial treatment is administered to the patient, ages 4 through 17 years, in very small doses and gradually increased over time until the body develops the “ability to no longer recognize peanut as foreign.”

“What we are trying to achieve here is the ability for children to be protected from that accidental exposure that may happen in the community,” he explained.

The company's stock shot up more than 20 percent on the heels of the news.

Dallas added that he’s also looking to expand the treatment to other nut allergies.

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