Here's where November jobs growth took place

By JobsFOXBusiness

November jobs report was disappointing: Dennis Gartman

The Gartman Letter CEO Dennis Gartman discusses how the Federal Reserve may use a “wait-and-see” approach when it comes to rate hikes and the November jobs report.

Job creation in November may have missed Wall Street’s expectations with 155,000 new positions added instead of the anticipated 200,000, but some sectors in the U.S. economy still saw exponential growth – while other industries remained fairly steady.

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Here’s a closer look at where the job gains occurred, according to data published on Friday by the Department of Labor.

Health care: Employment in this industry rose by 32,000 in November, particularly within ambulatory health care services, which added 19,000 jobs. Hospitals, meanwhile, added 13,000 jobs. Since the beginning of year, this sector has added a whopping 328,000 jobs.

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Manufacturing: This industry -- a centerpiece of President Trump’s campaign in 2016 was to revive it -- added 27,000 jobs in November, with 6,000 added in chemicals and 3,000 in primary metals. Over the course of the year, the industry has expanded by 288,000 jobs, mostly in large durable goods.

Transportation and warehousing: Jobs in this sector increased by 25,000 last month, with the most new jobs for couriers and messengers (8,000) and warehousing and storage (more than 6,000). At least 192,000 jobs have been created in this sector so far in 2018.

Retail: Despite holiday hiring, this sector remained largely unchanged in November, creating 18,000 new positions. That’s largely because it was offset by job losses in clothing and accessory stores, which lost 14,000 jobs, electronics and appliance jobs, which lost 11,000 jobs, and sporting goods, hobby and book stores, which lost 11,000. Jobs in general merchandise stores, however, spiked by 39,000. Other store retailers added 10,000 jobs.

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