Fmr. Federal Prosecutor: Rules Don't Quite Apply to Potential Presidents

By Government And Institutions FOXBusiness

Robert Ray: Any accusation Comey violated Hatch Act is baloney

Former Whitewater Independent Counsel Robert Ray on the FBI decision to reopen the investigation into Hillary Clinton's email scandal.

FBI Director James Comey is facing scrutiny from Democrats and Republicans over his decision to re-open the Hillary Clinton email investigation. Former Federal Prosecutor Robert Ray joined the FOX Business Network’s Mornings with Maria, to discuss why he believes Comey had no choice.

Continue Reading Below

“If he had done nothing and sat on this everybody would be screaming bloody murder about the fact that the public was entitled to know about this information, it wasn’t disclosed, and they made a decision about voting for president without full information. Hello, we live in a Democracy, get over it,” he said.

He also defended allegations that Director Comey violated the Hatch Act.

“Any accusation that Director Comey violated the Hatch Act is baloney and the contention by this group of 100 former federal prosecutors that Director Comey has acted improperly is also similarly ridiculous. What people don’t want to accept is that when it comes to investigating presidents or potential presidents the rules don’t quite apply like they do to everybody else and people have a hard time accepting that but it’s true,” he said.

More on this...

The former Whitewater Counsel also said the contents within the emails could carry some serious consequences for Huma Abedin and others.

“There may be some pretty candid discussions that are found on those emails that are going to present some questions for people about what their intent was,” he said.  “Remember Director Comey said that the problem was, although he acknowledged that this was extremely careless, his findings was that there wasn’t sufficient evidence of criminal intent and the question is whether or not any of those emails tend to answer that question. That would be sufficient to reopen an investigation and make a renewed decision about whether or not somebody should be held to account criminally for what happened.”

More From FOXBusiness.com

What do you think?

Click the button below to comment on this article.