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Which State Has the Highest Gas Prices?
Rising oil prices are making it painful for drivers to fill up their tanks—but which residents are being hit the hardest?

Filling Car With Gas

As crude prices continue to hold steady around $100 a barrel, the price of gas is also on the rise. While the national average currently sits at $3.55 for a gallon of regular unleaded, we break down the most expensive places in the country to fill up, according to AAA.

Reuters

Oahu, Hawaii

Hawaii

The Aloha State tops the list and has the honor of being the only state with average gas prices above $4.00 a gallon. Drivers on the island pay $4.04 for a gallon of regular.

California

California

The Golden State has the highest gas prices in the continental U.S. with a gallon of regular averaging $3.97 a gallon.

Alaska

Alaska

Despite having abundant oil fields, the state’s fuel prices have skyrocketed recently topping $3.94 for a gallon of regular in March.

New York

New York

Drivers in the Empire State are paying on average $3.75 for a gallon of unleaded, the highest on the east coast.

Connecticut

Connecticut

Connecticut’s gas prices continue to rise averaging just under $3.75 for a gallon of regular.

U.S. Capitol With Flag

Washington, D.C.

The nation’s capital isn’t immune from high gas prices as the average price to top off the presidential limo is $3.70 for a gallon of regular.

Nevada

Nevada

You better hit it big at the tables if you plan to gas up your vehicle on the way home, gas prices average just under $3.70 a gallon.

washingtonq

Washington

If the weather doesn’t get you down, the bill for filling up your tank will. A gallon of regular will cost you $3.68 in the Evergreen State.

illinois

Illinois

The Land of Lincoln will set drivers back at the pump. The cost of regular averaged $3.63 this week.

west virginia

West Virginia

The Mountain State rounds out the top 10 with the average cost of a gallon of regular coming in just under $3.63.

Which State Has the Highest Gas Prices?

Rising oil prices are making it painful for drivers to fill up their tanks—but which residents are being hit the hardest?

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