Secret app lets users light up the New York City skyline

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Secret app makes New York skyscrapers change color

Spireworks creator Mark Domino on the invitation-only app that allows users to control the light colors on two of New York's skyscrapers.

A secret phone app is changing the New York City skyline by allowing users to control the light on two skyscraper spires, the Bank of America Tower and 4 Times Square.

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Spireworks, an exclusive invitation-only web-based app, enables users to change spires’ colors using RGB LED lights that can be altered dynamically over a network.

“The project was initially designed around inviting friends and families into the mix, professional contacts, and then they in turn invited other people and it’s grown and the idea was that they would help animate the lights. All these aggregate people touching the lights over the course of hours and days and that would be the visual design,” Spireworks creator Mark Domino told FOX Business’ Sandra Smith.

The spires that Spireworks controls are part of the building owned by real estate tycoon Douglas Durst, chairman of the Durst Organization.

“There was a lot of discussion as to how to bring programming to the midtown spires and I was involved in those discussions and developed an early version of Spireworks at the time,” Domino said.

The app launched in 2010 and currently has 10,000 active users.

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Domino said the initial design purpose was to give its invite-only members a unique experience to connect with the city. However, as interest continues to grow, users are finding more creative ways to use the platform including birth announcements, engagements and even as a tool to impress a date.

“We just heard back through a survey we did from some bartenders saying they see people trying to pick each other up with it which is funny. But I don’t think that will work as well as the app gets more exposure, I don’t think that’s going to work,” he said.

Domino said he foresees the app becoming a paid program involving charitable donations and social benefits through its use.

“I think if there’s an end user payment made, it will go to charity.”

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