File photo of aedes aegypti mosquitoes in a mosquito cage at a laboratory in Cucuta, Colombia.

File photo of aedes aegypti mosquitoes in a mosquito cage at a laboratory in Cucuta, Colombia. (AP Photo/Ricardo Mazalan, File)

How Business Travelers Can Avoid Zika

By Business Leaders FOXBusiness

With Zika plaguing South America and the Caribbean, those traveling to the affected regions for vacation have to take extra precautions. In addition to vacationers though, business travelers have to pay special attention to where they're traveling to and review their employer's policies. 

Continue Reading Below

Here are a few tips from Suzanne Fahl, HR Editor and Senior Adviser at ThinkHR, a human resources knowledge company based in Pleasanton, CA on how business travelers can protect themselves from Zika. 

  • 1. Educate Your Employees About the Risks of Zika

    Educate Your Employees About the Risks of Zika

    skynesher (iStock)

    Make sure employees know the truth about the Zika virus. "Working professionals traveling to at-risk areas should know the symptoms, wihch include fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis, muscle pain and headaches," Fahl tells FOXBusiness.com. 

    Employers should educate employees traveling to Zika affected areas on the risks and the best ways to protect themselves. 

  • 2. Track Your Flights In and Out of Affected Areas

    Track Your Flights In and Out of Affected Areas

    photoncatcher (iStock)

    Even if you're not visiting a Zika affected region, hundreds of flights daily connect through areas that do have Zika like the Caribbean and Latin America. Now that the U.S. has confirmed cases of Zika, even areas like Floria are at risk. "Be aware of connecting flights in your travel plans as there may be passengers on your flights who have traveled from at-risk areas," says Fahl. 

  • 3. Know Your Employer's Quarantine Policy

    Know Your Employer's Quarantine Policy

    AP

    Some employers offer provisions for employees who have traveled to areas with an illness outbreak. For example, working from home for a few weeks could be an option for employees who may have contracted a virus. 

    Fahl says that 80% of those infected report no symptoms and as a result, employees and employers should be extra careful about controlling exposure in the workplace. 

    More on this...

Continue Reading Below