Facebook introducing new company branding

The typography and capitalization on Facebook-owned apps will be changed during the next few weeks to better communicate its “ownership structure.”

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On Nov. 4, the social media giant announced a new style of branding to ensure that the people using its products know they are owned by Facebook. The branding will further distinguish the Facebook company from the Facebook app, which will keep its own branding.

The move is to ensure that the people using its products know they are owned by Facebook, Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio of Facebook said.

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The white and blue “F” that users have come accustomed to for years will be replaced by the word "Facebook" and will appear in places such as the login and settings pages of Instagram for example.

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Fifteen years ago, Facebook started as a single app. Today, it offers a suite of products connecting families, friends, businesses and communities alike — and it wants everyone to know it.

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Facebooks main services include Facebook app, Messenger, Instagram, WhatsApp, Oculus, Workplace, Portal and Calibra. The apps share the same infrastructure and the teams behind them frequently work together, according to the company.

Facebook began this effort in June when it started including “from Facebook” within its apps.

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The change comes just after found Mark Zuckerberg’s social network in Washington began to seemingly shrink.

Bipartisan hostility against Facebook has been building for months, fueled by a series of privacy scandals, the site’s role in Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign and accusations that Facebook crushes competitors.

Now, with the 2020 elections approaching, Democrats especially are homing in on the conduct of the social media giant and its refusal to fact-check political ads and remove false ones.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.