Amazon signs lease for biggest NYC delivery station

The station will 'create hundreds of job opportunities'

Amazon has signed a lease for its biggest delivery station ever in New York City, the company confirmed to FOX Business.

The property Queens is 1 million square feet; the delivery station building will be 117,000 square feet, and the rest of the space will be used for parking, a spokesperson said.

"We are excited to increase our investment in the New York City area with a new delivery station that will provide fast and efficient deliveries and create hundreds of job opportunities for the talented local workforce," an Amazon spokesperson said.

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The former paper factory in Queens, where Amazon had originally planned to build its headquarters before Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-NY, blocked the company's move, is a strategic location for the tech giant because it allows access to Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

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Amazon has two fulfillment centers in New York City -- one in Staten Island, its largest fulfillment warehouse at 855,000 square feet, and one in Manhattan.

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Packages are transported to delivery stations after they are processed at Amazon's fulfillment centers and are then sent by van to customers' homes.

A man leaves an Amazon fulfillment center, March 19, 2020, on Staten Island, in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

The tech giant also announced on Wednesday that it is launching a global "Counterfeit Crimes Unit" made up of former federal prosecutors, investigators and data analysts to help the company catch third-party retailers that sell counterfeit products -- an issue that has led to years of legal trouble for the company.

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Amazon invested more than $500 million and employed more than 8,000 employees to fight fraud and abuse, including counterfeit, in 2019. That effort stopped an estimated 2.5 million bad actors and more than 6 billion suspected bad listings, but the company noted in a press release that more resources are needed to combat counterfeiters.

"Every counterfeiter is on notice that they will be held accountable to the maximum extent possible under the law, regardless of where they attempt to sell their counterfeits or where they're located," Dharmesh Mehta, Amazon's vice president of customer trust and partner support, said in a statement. "We are working hard to disrupt and dismantle these criminal networks, and we applaud the law enforcement authorities who are already part of this fight."

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