The Senate showed backbone against Saudi Arabia: Kennedy

An interesting coalition of liberty minded and dirty hippie senators voted to fly the bi-partisan bird in Saudi Arabia's face in a freedom-saving show of legislative force.

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The 56-41 vote stops U.S. military assistance in Yemen's civil war, which has become a brutal and immoral proxy battle between Iran and Saudi Arabia. Our involvement there hasn't made things any better for famine stricken civilians who are dying of starvation, disease and conflict by the tens of thousands, and the U.S. has no place sandwiched in between two freedom-hating, terror-funding regimes who can both afford their dumb war without our guns and bombs.

It's the first time since 1973 the senate has voted to *curtail* an unauthorized military incursion rubber stamped by successive administrations, and the senate is finally taking back its long usurped power that's been diminished and abdicated in the shadow of growing *executive* power.

That's why you see odd bedfellows like Bernie Sanders and Mike Lee standing shoulder to shoulder to protect *our* freedom and *our* democracy, something Saudi Arabia despises despite how conveniently and glowingly president after president speaks of her despotic monarchy.

The final straw for consistent hawks like Lindsey Graham has been the brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi, and say what you will about the slain journalist, but he was speaking truth to a brand of wretched power that seethes in violent jealously against our hot freedom.

130 Yemeni children are killed a day, that's 130 mini Jamal Kashoggi's whose lives are not worth less because of their unceremonious ends. With this level of slaughter causing the biggest humanitarian crisis on the planet in a tribalist Sunni on Shia bloodbath, there is no need for the U.S. to be involved in this mindless, indiscriminate killing.

Good for the Senate for taking back some of its constitutionally codified power, and for also unanimously passing a resolution that condemns Saudi responsibility in the Kashoggi assasination. It's about time we stand up for our own ideals instead of wading into the cesspool of moral equivalence, rationalizing the myth of Saudi Arabia's virtue.