Amazon, Apple silent on Democratic court-packing attempt after speaking out against Georgia election law

The tech companies were vocal about the Georgia election law

Big Tech companies that spoke out against Georgia’s recent elections bill have so far remained silent on the Democratic attempt to pack the Supreme Court.

Amazon, Twitter, Apple and Microsoft have all remained silent on the left-wing push to up the number of Supreme Court justices from nine to thirteen through legislation introduced on Thursday by Senator Ed Markey, D-Mass.

However, these companies were vocal in opposing Georgia's voting law, which went into effect last month. The bill was the subject of false attacks from President Biden and other Democrats

Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke out against the law at the beginning of April in a statement to Axios, saying that the company believes that voting should be easier for "every eligible citizen" through new technologies.

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"The right to vote is fundamental in a democracy. American history is the story of expanding the right to vote to all citizens, and Black people, in particular, have had to march, struggle and even give their lives for more than a century to defend that right," Cook said. "Apple believes that, thanks in part to the power of technology, it ought to be easier than ever for every eligible citizen to exercise their right to vote."

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"We support efforts to ensure that our democracy’s future is more hopeful and inclusive than its past," the CEO added.

Amazon also spoke out against the law, with the company saying that the company supports legislation that expands and safeguards voting rights.

"It has been fifty-six years since the Voting Rights Act became law, yet efforts to disenfranchise Black people and other minorities continue to this day," reads the statement. "The ability to vote is one of the most prized fundamental rights in our American democracy, and Amazon supports policies that protect and expand those rights."

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Amazon also said it stood against "efforts in other states aimed at restricting the ability of Americans to vote, and we call on those states to follow Virginia's leadership by expanding voter protection instead." 

Twitter -- which maintains an office in Atlanta, Georgia -- called the law "a dangerous step backwards."

"Voting should be accessible to everyone who is eligible," Jessica Herrera-Flanigan, vice president of public policy in the Americas for Twitter, said in a statement to CNET. "It is critical that we collectively oppose voter suppression and promote voting access and election transparency."

She added that Twitter "remains committed to protecting voting rights" and pointed to their "civic integrity and engagement work, which strives to ensure that people can participate in election without suppression and intimidation and with the reliable information they need to engage."

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Microsoft President Brad Smith echoed the other tech executives, saying in an April press release that the tech giant was also "concerned" about the Georgia law and bringing up that the company spoke out against the bill before it made it out of the state legislature.

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"Two things are clear to us. First, the right to vote is the most cherished aspect of democracy," wrote Smith. "And second, this new law has important provisions that unfairly restrict the rights of people to vote legally, securely, and safely. That's why we voiced concern about this legislation even before it was passed."

Apple, Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Twitter all did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment on the Democratic attempt to pack the Supreme Court.