Chicago police vote no confidence in city's top prosecutor

By James DeRosaNewsFOXBusiness

Since the shocking decision by Cook County prosecutors to drop all 16 felony charges against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett, the relationship between Chicago Police and Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx has gone from icy to volatile.

On Thursday, both a group of suburban police chiefs joined with the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police said that the relationship couldn't be prepared. They officially announced a vote of no confidence in Foxx and demanded her resignation from the State Attorney's Office.

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In an interview with FOX Business’ Trish Regan, Chicago Fraternal Order of Police president Kevin Graham reiterated the frustration that law enforcement have had with the city's top prosecutor and her office.

“Today, the police chiefs around the county and from one end to the other have all gathered and with one voice said she should step down,” Graham said on Thursday.

Foxx’s office issued a statement defending her record on her behalf, hinting that she would not resign.

“I was elected by the people of Cook County to pursue community safety, prevent harm, and uphold the values of fairness and equal justice,” Foxx said in the statement. “I’m proud of my record in doing that, and I plan to do so through the end of my term and, if the people so will it, into the future.”

In January, Smollett reported he was the victim of a homophobic and racist attack while walking the streets of Chicago. Weeks later and after an extensive investigation by CPD, he was charged with lying to law enforcement.

Prosecutors decided to drop all charges against Smollett pushing the City of Chicago to demand Smollett to reimburse the city to the tune of $130,000.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said that the actor should “pay the city back” during a news conference last Thursday.

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Mark Geragos, Smollett's attorney, said his client "will not be intimidated into paying."

Thursday was the deadline the Chicago mayor gave Smollett to cough up what the city spent investigating his allegations.