The Latest: 10 fishermen plead guilty in shark fin case

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This Nov. 28, 2018 photo provided by the United States Attorney's Office and introduced as evidence in court in Honolulu shows some of the hundreds of shark fins seized from a Japanese fishing boat. U.S. prosecutors in Hawaii accuse the owner and officers of the Japanese fishing boat of helping Indonesian fishermen smuggle nearly 1,000 shark fins. Hamada Suisan Co. Ltd., the Japanese business that owned the vessel, and JF Zengyoren, a Japanese fishing cooperative, were charged on Dec. 11, 2018, with aiding and abetting the trafficking and smuggling of shark fins. (U.S. Attorney's Office via AP)

The Latest on shark fin smuggling charges (all times local):

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4:15 p.m.

Ten Indonesian fishermen who were arrested in Hawaii and charged with attempting to smuggle shark fins have plead guilty to a lesser charge.

Court records show four of them pleaded guilty Friday morning to a misdemeanor charge that they attempted to export the fins. A judge sentenced them to the five days they already spent in jail. Later in the day, the six others pleaded guilty to the same charge and received the same sentence.

The owner and officers of the Japanese fishing boat they were working on have been charged with aiding and abetting the trafficking and smuggling of shark fins. A cooperative the boat belongs to is also charged.

It's against U.S. law to remove the fins of sharks at sea. Prosecutors say the fishermen harvested fins from sharks that were still alive and then discarded in the ocean.

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11:45 a.m.

Four Indonesian fishermen who were arrested in Hawaii and charged with attempting to smuggle shark fins have pleaded guilty to a lesser charge.

Court records show the four men pleaded guilty Friday to a misdemeanor charge that they attempted to export the fins. A judge sentenced them to time they already served in jail.

Six others who were charged with smuggling are expected to plead guilty to the same charge and receive the same sentence later Friday.

The owner and officers of the Japanese fishing boat they were working on have been charged with aiding and abetting the trafficking and smuggling of shark fins. A cooperative the boat belongs to is also charged.

It's against U.S. law to remove the fins of sharks at sea. Prosecutors say the fishermen harvested fins from some sharks that were still alive and then discarded in the ocean.

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9: 10 a.m.

U.S. prosecutors in Hawaii are accusing the owners and officers of a Japanese fishing boat of helping Indonesian fishermen smuggle nearly 1,000 shark fins, worth about $58,000 on the black market.

Boat owners Hamada Suisan Co. Ltd. and JF Zengyoren, or Japan Fisheries Cooperatives in English, are charged with aiding and abetting the smuggling. Ten fishermen have been charged with smuggling.

A Hamada representative in Japan said Friday that the Indonesian crew members had shark fins without the captain's knowledge.

JF Zengyoren declined to comment, saying it hadn't seen the complaint.

It's against U.S. law to remove the fins of sharks at sea. Prosecutors say the fishermen harvested fins from some sharks that were still alive and then discarded in the ocean.

Fins are a pricey delicacy often used in soups.