Sears, Kmart Drop 31 Trump Home Items From Their Online Shops

By Jon Herskovitz Retail Reuters

FILE - In this Thursday, May 17, 2012, file photo, shoppers walk into Sears in Peabody, Mass. The troubled department store chain, says it may sell more of its real estate, cut more jobs and sell more of its famous brands as it seeks to make a profit.... The company, which also runs Kmart stores, wants to cut costs by at least $1 billion a year. Shares of Sears Holding Corp., which are down 40 percent this year, soared 45 percent before the stock market opened Friday, Feb. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File) (The Associated Press)

Major U.S. retailers Sears and Kmart this week removed 31 Trump Home items from their online product offerings to focus on more profitable items, a spokesman said on Saturday.

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The decision follows retailer Nordstrom Inc's announcement this week it had decided to stop carrying Ivanka Trump's apparel because of declining sales, prompting President Donald Trump to take to Twitter to defend his daughter. White House spokesman Sean Spicer characterized the Nordstrom move as a "direct attack" on the president's policies.

Neither Sears nor Kmart carried the Trump Home products in their retail stores, a Sears Holdings Corp spokesman said. Kmart is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sears Holdings.

"As part of the company's initiative to optimize its online product assortment, we constantly refine that assortment to focus on our most profitable items," spokesman Brian Hanover said in a statement.

"Amid that streamlining effort, 31 Trump Home items were among the items removed online this week," he said, adding those items can be found through a third-party vendor, without providing additional information about the products.

The Trump Home collection includes lines of furniture, lighting, bedding, mirrors and chandeliers, some from makers who supply the items to Trump hotels, according to the collection's website.

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Nordstrom's sales of Ivanka Trump's line of clothing and shoes fell by nearly one-third in the past fiscal year, with sharp drops in sales weeks before her father was elected president on Nov. 8, the Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday. (Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; editing by Grant McCool)