Company set to finish work on Dakota Access oil pipeline

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  • Military vehicles are staged near the path of the Dakota Access pipeline Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun and that the full pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

    Military vehicles are staged near the path of the Dakota Access pipeline Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun and that the full ... pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson) (The Associated Press)

  • Razor wire and concrete barriers protect access to the Dakota Access pipeline drilling site Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun and that the full pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

    Razor wire and concrete barriers protect access to the Dakota Access pipeline drilling site Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun ... and that the full pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson) (The Associated Press)

The company building the Dakota Access oil pipeline says it plans to immediately resume construction on the long-stalled project.

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Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners on Wednesday got final permission from the Army to lay pipe under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. The project had been delayed for months before President Donald Trump last month instructed the Army Corps of Engineers to advance work on the pipeline.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has vowed to continue fighting the construction. Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault said in a statement Wednesday that the Standing Rock Sioux are prepared to continue battling the pipeline "in the courts."

The tribe fears a pipeline leak could contaminate its drinking water. But ETP contends the pipeline is safe.

Opponents of the project held demonstrations Wednesday in several cities, including Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C.