City Council wants state review after boil-water advisory

Markets Associated Press

  • Ronette Cooley, right, helps Courtney Patterson fill jugs with water at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, where water buffaloes are available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up over a dozen spots across town to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Ronette Cooley, right, helps Courtney Patterson fill jugs with water at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, where water buffaloes are available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up over a dozen spots ... across town to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) (The Associated Press)

  • Ronette Cooley watches as she fills containers with water at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh where water buffaloes are available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up over a dozen spots across town to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Ronette Cooley watches as she fills containers with water at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh where water buffaloes are available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up over a dozen spots across town ... to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) (The Associated Press)

  • Tim Stuhldeher carries a container of water to his stepmother's house after filling it at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh where the city made water available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up over a dozen spots across town to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Tim Stuhldeher carries a container of water to his stepmother's house after filling it at a city fire station in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh where the city made water available for the public on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. The city set up ... over a dozen spots across town to distribute potable water after tests by the state Department of Environmental Protection showed low levels of chlorine in water at a facility that draws water from the city's Highland Park reservoirs, prompting the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water advisory for 100,000 customers of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) (The Associated Press)

Pittsburgh's City Council is calling on the state to investigate the city water authority's contract with a private corporation after this week's boil-water advisory that affected 100,000 customers.

Continue Reading Below

The council is requesting an audit and an investigation into the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority's contract with Veolia.

The move comes after the PWSA issued a boil-water advisory Tuesday evening affecting 100,000 customers including hospitals, schools and restaurants. The advisory was lifted Thursday.

Mayor Bill Peduto said Thursday there was no trace of bacteria that can cause diarrhea in the city's water, even though some tests Tuesday evening showed there wasn't enough chlorine in water treated at one plant.

Council members say they also have concerns about the high lead levels in the water and the ongoing overbilling of residents.