Trump plan for 20 pct tax on Mexico exports raises eyebrows

Markets Associated Press

  • In this Jan. 23, 2017 photo, Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto gives a press conference at Los Pinos presidential residence in Mexico City. Pena Nieto said Mexico's attitude towards the Donald J. Trump administration should not be aggressive or biased, but one of dialogue. However, days later he canceled a planned meeting with Trump, signaling a remarkable souring of relations just days into the new administration. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

    In this Jan. 23, 2017 photo, Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto gives a press conference at Los Pinos presidential residence in Mexico City. Pena Nieto said Mexico's attitude towards the Donald J. Trump administration should not be aggressive or ... biased, but one of dialogue. However, days later he canceled a planned meeting with Trump, signaling a remarkable souring of relations just days into the new administration. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, file photo, a tug boat goes by the pier of a container terminal in Tokyo. Talk of a possible 20 percent tax on U.S. imports from Mexico is raising eyebrows in Asia, where exports to the U.S. drive growth in many economies. Japanese officials said Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, they hoped to soon hold talks on trade with U.S. officials. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, file photo, a tug boat goes by the pier of a container terminal in Tokyo. Talk of a possible 20 percent tax on U.S. imports from Mexico is raising eyebrows in Asia, where exports to the U.S. drive growth in ... many economies. Japanese officials said Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, they hoped to soon hold talks on trade with U.S. officials. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) (The Associated Press)

Talk of a possible 20 percent tax on U.S. imports from Mexico is raising eyebrows in Asia, where exports to the U.S. drive growth in many economies.

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Japanese officials said Friday they hoped to soon hold talks on trade with U.S. officials. Finance Minister Taro Aso said he hoped to explain the "reality of Japanese employment" in the U.S.

President Donald Trump's press secretary Sean Spicer said the 20 percent tax was among several options to finance building a wall along the U.S. southern border, but no decision has been made.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto (PAYN'-yuh nee-EH'-toh) scrapped a scheduled trip to Washington next week over the issue.

The Japanese government spokesman refused comment on the spat, but said Tokyo would watch for any impact on Japanese companies.